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Yard Digs Leading To States History Lesson

by Bren
(Wisconsin,USA)


Hi to everyone,

First off, I am brand spankin new at detecting, and I'm already finding that it leads me into a great deal of history of where my bones have formed from the dust beneath my feet.

I left this afternoon to seek out new beginnings and to dig up multiple divots in my yard as to take pleasure in passing a couple of pleasurable hours of the day.

The land that I am on is of farm land for the past 120 years and was detecting near the original barn site of the area.

My finds were of no value. Just your typical iron nails and such. But to me as a brand spankin new detector, everything I find is a treasure.:)

These finds that I have found had lead me to searching the web for answers of the history to be found in my area. The experience was like someone jabbed me in the bum with a pitchfork. Which lead me to hours of reading. Reading is not my best interest. But this just grabbed my attention.

I happen to live in Wisconsin. From my reading of most posts, folks can't seem to detect much in Wisconsin. I beg to differ. Perhaps there is not as much for metal detecting as most would be accustomed to. But there sure is a great deal of history. Which to me, is a treasure in itself.

I happen to live in the state of Wisconsin. In a very small town at the base of the thumb, which is located in Kewaunee County.

In the 1790's, Trading posts began to appear along the Kewaunee river. These trading posts were mainly for fur.

In the mid 1830's there was a fake gold rush that had drawn a great deal of people to come. Only to discover that it was pyrite, (fools gold).

In the 1840's through to the 1850's they found a new rush. It was called the green rush. Timber. Multiple sawmills were set up through the area and were shipped to multiple areas across the great lakes region.

In 1871. The greatest fire in America's history hit. It was called the Peshtigo fire. At the same time and the same day, the great Chicago fire occurred, along with another handful of fires in Wisconsin.

The Peshtigo fire alone wiped out such a great deal of ac-courage and about 2000 people. All in one night. Devastating.

We own some woods that has been in this fire, and still, 148 years later.....there are still signs of the fire.

This fire was very hot and aggressive, I begin to wonder if anything such as coins dropped could have survived such a tremble in history.

The question is....could coins before this time be found....or have they met a different destination.

A puzzle of time to be sure.

I hope that you have enjoyed this history lesson of the small community that I reside in.

I may not find small valuable trinkets, but I can surely find a great deal more.

May all of you find the treasures that you seek, and so much more.

God Bless.



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Sep 30, 2019

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History~Gotta Love It
by: Bren

Thank you frank.

I'm glad that you enjoyed what I wrote. I do love to learn about those from the past.

I have a feeling that digging and finding little treasures will only be a part of what is to come. No matter the object being dug. It's all intriguing, and I'm looking forward to the next whole to be dug.

Happy digging:)

Bren






Sep 29, 2019

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A Wonderful Story of History
by: Frank

Thanks Bren, I enjoyed your story. It's always a pleasure for me to learn some new piece of history.

Your finds are just the beginning to what I hope will lead you toward an adventure of discoveries.

Newbies sometimes become upset due to a lack of finding the good stuff. Never allow the seeds of doubt to enter your mind when you find what we call junk items. Instead, use the items as stepping stones to greater finds.

Allow the junk to paint you a picture of what kind of an area you are searching, no matter where you are. Eventually, you will get an idea of what kind of history has passed through that area, and then, the good finds will begin to emerge.

Coins in a fire sometimes do survive. It depends on the coin, and how hot or close to the fire the coins were located.

Keep us posted on what you're finding. Or post pictures for identification.

Thanks again,

Frank

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