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South Carolina Lost Treasure


South Carolina lost treasure sites are listed on this page. However, I cannot promise that this information is completely accurate. As treasure tales go, because they have been passed down through many years, certain elements of the lost treasure story may have been altered, either intentionally or otherwise.

This information should be researched through other means as well. Never rely on one piece of information about a treasure story you are researching. Use multiple research tools.


 
Good luck! And have fun in your search for South Carolina lost treasure.

South Carolina Lost Treasure Sites


Drayton Hall

Located on the Ashley River, near the intersection of routes 57 and 61. This colonial plantation was built in 1738, and later occupied by the British during the Revolutionary War. Supposedly, a few buried treasures are in the area.

Hunt's Bluff

Located on the Great Pee Wee River near route 57, approximately five miles west of Blenheim. During the Revolutionary War, a large barge carrying military supplies for the British troops, overturned near this spot on the river. A military payroll may have been part of the supplies.

North Island

Located in Winyah Bay. In 1781, a group of Tory raiders buried a large amount of their stolen loot in different areas. Much of the buried treasure is gold and silver. Before they could get back to the treasure, the Tories were caught and killed. Over the years, some of the treasure has been recovered by treasure hunters.

Mulberry Plantation

Located on the Cooper River, approximately thirty miles north of Charleston. In 1715, during the Yamasee War, a band of renegade Indians buried a large treasure of gold coins and jewelry in the area.

Fort Carey

Located on the Wateree River, just south of Camden where the I-20 bridge crosses the river. During construction of the newer bridge, workers found artifacts and coins along the river bank. The coins may have been a part of a buried treasure. Many soldiers would bury their personnal belongings for safekeeping.

The Williamson Plantation

Located on route 322, approximately four miles east of McConnel. In July of 1780, the Patriots attacked and killed the ruthless Tory Captain Huck, and his raiders. Over a period of five years, the raiders accumulated a large amount of plunder. They supposedly buried it in the area.

Congaree River

Located in this river near Columbia is a massive amount of cannons, rifles, muskets, ammunition, and more than one million musket balls. The supplies were thrown into the river by General William T. Sherman after he captured Columbia. He did not want the supplies to fall back into the hands of the Confederates. These relics are treasures worth in the millions.

Understand The Laws Regarding Digging On State Lands

The Antiquities Act of 1906 and the ARPA  (Archaeology Resources Protection Act)laws explain why you cannot remove artifacts from State or Federal lands that are more than 100 years old.

Digging for a treasure that is more than 100 years old comes under the protection of these two laws. But remember, the laws only pertain to State and Federal lands. Know the law before you dig.

5 Ways to Earn Money with a Metal Detector


South Carolina lost treasure may be located in ghost towns.

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