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Nevada Lost Treasure


Nevada lost treasure sites are listed on this page. However, I cannot promise that this information is completely accurate. As treasure tales go, because they have been passed down through many years, certain elements of the lost treasure story may have been altered, either intentionally or otherwise.

This information should be researched through other means as well. Never rely on one piece of information about a treasure story you are researching. Use multiple research tools.




Nevada Lost Treasure Sites

 
Good luck! And have fun in your search for Nevada lost treasure.

Austin

Located on U.S. 50. In the middle 1800's, Austin was a mining boomtown. It closed down in the late 1800's. Some of the old buildings are still remaining. There may be relics here.

Berlin Mining Camp

Located just off State rte. 21, near Ione. This popular mining camp of the 1800's yielde both gold and silver. Today, no visible remains of the camp can be seen. However, that doesn't mean that it can't be located.

Goldfield

Located on U.S. 95, approximately 25 miles south of Tonopah. This town was once a large gold mining town. In the early 1900's Goldfield mines produced more than $100 million in gold. Some of the old towns buildings are still remaining.

The Comstock Lode

Located outside of Virginia City. This site was a very rich area that produced more than $300 million of gold and silver. Many of the mines can still be worked today.

The Lost Pogue Gold Mine

Located in the Pancake Mts, approximately 5 miles north of Pogue Station.

Tohakum Peak

Located north end of Pyramid Lake. In the 1880's a gold miner cached $250,000 in gold ore near Tohakum Peak. After the winter snow melted, he was unable to locate the buried gold.

Pyramid Lake

During the early 1800's, marauding Indians attacked a wagon train carrying Chinese laborers, and $50,000 in gold coins. They threw the coins along the shore of Pyramid Lake, near Anano Island.

Understand The Laws Regarding Digging On State Lands

The Antiquities Act of 1906 and the ARPA  (Archaeology Resources Protection Act)laws explain why you cannot remove artifacts from State or Federal lands that are more than 100 years old.

Digging for a treasure that is more than 100 years old comes under the protection of these two laws. But remember, the laws only pertain to State and Federal lands. Know the law before you dig.

Nevada lost treasures may be located in ghost towns.

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