Buried Treasure in South Carolina -

Five Places To Search

Buried treasure in South Carolina is scattered throughout the State. You can locate these treasures. Many individuals like yourself have uncovered hidden treasures of different sizes throughout the U.S. Some of these individuals were professional treasure hunters, yet some were novices as well. But before you begin your search, there are a few things you need to do. They are the things that make the difference in whether or not you can actually locate a treasure. They are the things that all professional treasure hunters do.

The first thing you should do is research the treasures I have listed in this article. Take the information I have given to you and research further. Use the Internet, historical societies, and the archives. “Knowledge is power.” Especially when you are searching for a lost treasure. Professional treasure hunters never attempt to search out a treasure until they have enough information. Sometimes the research takes more time than the actual search.

The second thing you need to do is to purchase a metal detector. Do not spend a lot of money. A quality, new, metal detector can be purchased for between $350 - $450. You don’t need a detector with all of the bells and whistles either. Once you learn how to use a less expensive model, then you should move up to the more expensive detectors. Read the owners manual as well as practicing using your metal detector. By doing so you will become proficient at locating items.

Here are five areas to begin your search for buried treasure in South Carolina.

Murrell‘s Inlet, has produced a few small treasures of gold and Spanish silver coins. Possibly they were treasures buried by pirates. The inlet is located halfway between Georgetown and Myrtle Beach. Could there be more buried treasure there?

Fort Randall, located near Myrtle Beach, and just north, is part of a legend that says that there are Civil War treasures buried nearby.

Fort Carey - located on the Wateree River, just south of Camden where the I-20 bridge crosses the river. During construction of the newer bridge, workers found artifacts and coins along the river bank. The coins may have been a part of a buried treasure. Many soldiers would bury their personal belongings for safekeeping.

Along the Santee River is an area where Confederate soldiers stole a Union payroll of $100,000 in gold and silver coins, and then buried the treasure near St. Stephen.

Saluca, located ten miles northeast of Greenwood, is an area that may still hold six tons of silver bullion. The silver was stolen by Union soldiers and then thrown into the Saluda River near Saluca.

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For more information on how to research buried treasure, visit my research page here.

Good luck! And have fun in your search for buried treasure in South Carolina.

Anytime you are going on to private property be sure to ask for permission. If you are going on to State or Federal lands to search for buried treasure in South Carolina, you should know the laws of that State.

Visit here for more information on State laws regarding relic hunting, treasure hunting, and artifacts.

Buried treasure in South Carolina may be located in ghost towns.