Buried Treasure In North Carolina -

Seven Places To Search

Buried treasure in North Carolina consists mainly as pirate treasures. However, treasures of different kinds are also buried there. But before you go searching, you need to do more research, and you should have a metal detector.

First, I want to explain to you why research is so important. You need to research these treasure stories further. The more information you have, the better your chances of locating a lost treasure. Sometimes, the most difficult part of searching for a treasure, is the research. If you can get as much information as possible regarding your treasure, then the search itself becomes easier.

A good place to begin your research is on the Internet, but don’t stop there. Visit the historical societies of the area you want to search in. Most historical societies have a website. Try to get as much information either from the websites, or visiting in person. Ask questions about the particular buried treasure story you are researching. At times you will get information that will help you in your search. Also, read old newspaper articles, and old books. Search out any clues, or more leads that could help you in your search for buried treasure. And then follow up on any information you receive.

It’s also a good idea to have a metal detector. If you do not own a detector, and you are serious about searching for buried treasure in North Carolina, then you should purchase one. Spend between $350 - $450 for a metal detector, and no more. You do not need an expensive detector that has all of the bells and whistles. The expensive models are most often very complicated for the new user.

Here are seven areas to begin your search for buried treasure in North Carolina.

The Gander Hall Plantation Treasure, is a brief mention about a Civil War treasure buried on the Plantation. It consists of approximately $30,000 in gold and silver coins. The Plantation is located about 2 miles west of Wilmington.

Anne Blyth, the female pirate supposedly buried a treasure of gold bullion and silver coins, near Fort Caswell, at the mouth of the Cape Fear River, just south of Southport.

Shaklesford Beach holds a treasure from the Civil War. Apparently, during the war, a Confederate blockade runner while being attacked by a Union gunboat, ran aground on Shaklesford Beach. The crew brought a large chest of silver coins to shore and buried it somewhere along the high sand dunes. All of the Confederates were killed. The beach is located on the southwest side of Harkers Island, approximately ten miles south of Beauford.

Money Hill, located between Wrightsville Beach and Kirkland on route 17, may hold a treasure buried by pirates.

Blackbeard The Pirate, was known to have used the area near Elizabeth City on many occasions. There are stories of him burying several treasures in that area. Elizabeth City is located on route 17 in Pasquotank County.

Plum Point, near Bath on Pamlico Sound, was used as a stopping point by many pirates. Treasure hunters have found coins and artifacts in the area. One individual located $10,000 in coins.

The Campgrounds, located outside of Red Crossing on route 64, may be the site of a Revolutionary War treasure. Supposedly, a British officer, hid a large cache of gold and silver coins there.

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For more information on how to research buried treasure, visit my research page.

More About Reasearch

Good luck! And have fun in your search for buried treasure in North Carolina.

Anytime you are going on to private property be sure to ask for permission. If you are venturing on to State or Federal lands you should know the laws of that State.

Visit here for more information on State laws regarding relic hunting, treasure hunting, and artifacts.

Buried treasure in North Carolina may be located in ghost towns.